Articles tagged with:
economics

  • Twelve Apostles in Victoria, Australia

    Australia: an economy in transition

    Despite a recent slowdown in its crucial exports of minerals and commodities, Australia’s economy appears to be in rude health as it transitions from a focus on the mining sector to other industries. With a highly regulated banking sector that was not impacted as much by the financial crisis as some other developed countries, and stable levels of household debt, Australia looks set to move on to the next stage of its economic development.

  • A political conundrum

    While the financial markets have become increasingly sensitive to political developments, politicians themselves seem unable to come up with real solutions to the economic problems facing citizens. Furthermore, the public is confused and dismayed by the extremes of impotent politics and unrestricted powers for the state, and now distrusts politicians progressively more, says ECR Research.

  • Three glasses filled to different amounts

    China: finding its comfort zone

    The launch of the Shanghai Free Trade Zone last September was hailed as a seminal moment for the Chinese economy and its place alongside the rest of the world. A year on, has the anticipation been met in reality?

  • Vineyards of Mendoza, Argentina

    Latin America: a positive future

    Despite the negative headlines emanating from Argentina in recent months, the outlook for corporates in Latin America as a whole remains upbeat. And with a number of trade agreements in place, foreign investment in the region looks set to continue.

  • Two elephants greeting each other

    Nigeria: the giant of Africa

    In terms of its geographical size, population and economy, Nigeria is a force to be reckoned with in Africa. Now the continent’s biggest economy, Nigeria has undergone many changes in recent years. Yet there are some fundamental challenges which still remain and need to be overcome before it can fully realise its economic potential. Treasury Today looks at recent economic and infrastructural developments in the country and what they mean for businesses operating in the country.

  • Juan Pablo Cuevas, Bank of America Merrill Lynch

    Juan Pablo Cuevas, Head of Global Transaction Services, Latin America and the Caribbean, at Bank of America Merrill Lynch, explains why many Latin American countries have outperformed developed economies in recent years, the importance of trade to the region, and the challenges that remain before Latin America can realise its full potential.

  • Business man pressing location on graphic

    Banking on sector expertise

    Global companies need global banking partners that are able to understand, not only the constraints and opportunities within each country or region, but also within their business sector. After all, what works well in one industry may be wholly inappropriate in another. In this cash management review, Citi Treasury and Trade Solutions for Asia Pacific explain to us the benefits of sector expertise that its clients are able to draw upon, with examples of key trends across four of the key sectors covered by the bank.

  • Pile of money used in Cambodia

    Cambodia: a snapshot

    While welcome progress has been made towards breaking Cambodia’s year-long political impasse, legislators have done little to help entrepreneurs in a country whose process for setting up a business is among the very longest and most complex in the world. Treasury Today Asia considers Cambodia’s banking environment, the factors holding back capital market development and progress towards integration with ASEAN.

  • ASEAN integration

    This month’s question

    “What benefits would greater ASEAN integration bring to corporates operating there – and to the broader region? Also, what progress is being made towards the establishment of a pan-ASEAN clearing and settlements system?”

  • shipping-port-thailand

    Benefits of Asia FTAs limited by complexity

    Bilateral and regional free trade agreements (FTAs) have been proliferating at an astonishing rate across Asia in recent years. But how many businesses in the region are actually utilising them? And of those that are, how much of a difference are they making to their trading activities?